Carreño at Carnegie Hall, 1897 – 1916

Posted on October 1, 2014 by

Five years after the opening night (May 5, 1891) of Carnegie’s new Music Hall, Teresa Carreño made her appearance on January 8, 1897. This appearance was one of thirty-two performances she gave at Carnegie Hall, the last one occurring on December 8, 1916—six months before her death on June 12, 1917.1 Of these thirty-two performances, Carreño appeared in twenty-three as a soloist with full orchestra, and in nine as featured solo pianist.

In Documenting Teresa Carreño, I have curated content about each of these performances by creating an individual record for each with the following: description – repertoire, conductor, orchestra, time of concert, and ticket prices; primary source citations – advertisements, announcements, reviews, and concert programs; coverage – temporal (dates) and geographic (location); tags – venue [i.e. Carnegie Hall], geographic location [i.e. New York – New York], year, composer and composition title of repertoire performed by Carreño. Whenever possible, I have added links to primary source materials that are available in the public domain or as digital objects, so they can be accessed online and to encourage greater interest in Carreño’s performance career. In addition to researching details about her appearances in Carnegie Hall documented in nineteenth and twentieth-century newspapers and music journals, I accessed the Carnegie Hall Performance History Search, which contains records of performances at Carnegie Hall from 1891 through 1950, to verify details related to each of Carreño’s performances. (more…)

  1. The total performance count is based on programs held at Carnegie Hall Archives, as well as other available primary source materials.
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Open Access Publishing and Geo-Spatial Tools for (Music) Research

Posted on September 22, 2014 by

Here is a version of my talk, which I presented at the Digital Frontiers 2014 conference at Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas on September 18, 2014.

Introduction

In the introduction to her book, Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology and the Future of the Academy, Kathleen Fitzpatrick, writes, it is “important for us to consider the work that the book is and isn’t doing for us; the ways that it remains vibrant and vital; and the ways that it has become undead, haunting the living from beyond the grave.”1 What I think Fitzpatrick means by “undead,” is that although the scholarly monograph may not be as viable a format as it once was, it is still considered to be the gold standard in humanities scholarship, primarily when it relates to promotion, tenure, and peer review. At my current institution, I am not limited to publishing exclusively in print format or an individually authored monograph, therefore, I felt free to explore open modes of scholarly publishing and digital technologies, which could greatly enhance my research.  (more…)

  1. Kathleen Fitzpatrick. Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology and the Future of the Academy. (NYU Press, 2011):5.
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Digital Frontiers 2014

Posted on September 21, 2014 by

I have just returned from Digital Frontiers 2014, a conference at Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas where I had the pleasure of spending two days with a wonderfully diverse crowd of people representing K-12 education, higher education, academic/public libraries, and museums. Thank you to our wonderful host, Spencer D. C. Keralis and the great team of people running the event, including Maristella Feustle, Anjum Najmi, Courtney Jacobs and many others! As Spencer put it, this conference is an experiment, which possibly makes people feel uncomfortable or like they don’t belong (as Dorothea Salo discussed in her keynote. The attendees represented a diverse set of disciplines, institutions, and backgrounds who may normally not cross paths at their disciplinary or professional organization-specific conferences, yet there is one thing that brought us together—our common curiosity and involvement with the digital humanities—which I think is an integral part of what makes us a community, and as Miriam Posner stated in her keynote, a “community happens when people are genuinely invested in seeing each other succeed.”  (more…)

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