Category Archives: Digital Scholarship

Why is it so quiet here?

Posted on January 3, 2019 by

I write about various topics relevant to those who work in digital humanities, musicology, libraries, digital scholarship, and open research data. Some of my posts are published on this blog, while others are published on the Digital Scholarship blog. You can also find data, code, and materials used for my projects and workshops in the BCDigSchol GitHub Repository and personal GitHub Repository.

 

 

 

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Libraries and museums are essential contributors to Americans’ lives

Posted on March 23, 2017 by

In the President’s proposed FY 2018 budget (p. 5), the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) is one of eighteen independent agencies that would be completely eliminated. In a statement from the Director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Dr. Katheryn K. Matthew describes the value and impact that funding from the IMLS has on communities:

The institutions we serve provide vital resources that contribute significantly to Americans’ economic development, education, health, and well-being… our grants and programs support libraries and museums as essential contributors to improving Americans’ quality of life.

A long list of professional organizations have spoken out against the proposed cuts to the NEA, NEH, and IMLS; and many of these organizations and individuals are urging people to contact their representatives in order to demonstrate the impact that the programs funded by these agencies have made on our lives, society, and cultural existence.1  (more…)

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MLA Conference Diary (Reflection on Challenges, Evolving Roles, and Community)

Posted on March 11, 2016 by

Cross-posted on the MLA Conference Diary (IAML website). The annual conference of the Music Library Association was held March 2-5, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Each year the MLA conference brings together people with a shared interest in music librarianship and music resources. While this interest may be directly linked to our professional roles and careers, we also represent a community of people who may have started out as musicians, archivists and librarians working with music-specific materials, but now represent roles in emerging or evolving areas, such as metadata, discovery services, digital preservation, or digital humanities. It is this sense of community that brings me (and others I know) to the MLA conference every year.

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