Category Archives: Documenting Carreño

Happy 163rd Birthday, Teresa Carreño / Feliz Cumpleaños!

Posted on December 18, 2016 by

One hundred and sixty three years ago today (12/22/1853), María Teresa Gertrudis de Jesús Carreño (Teresa Carreño) was born in Caracas, Venezuela. She became a piano prodigy who débuted at Irving Hall in New York City on November 25, 1862 at the age of eight years old. Performing works by Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Sigismond Thalberg, Theodor Döhler, and Louis M. Gottschalk, which delighted her audience and demonstrated her virtuosic abilities, prompting New York critics to write: (more…)

Digital Madeleines and Breadcrumbs: Discovering the Musical Past through Multimodal Analyses

Posted on June 24, 2015 by

On June 22, 2015, I co-presented with Francesca Giannetti (Rutgers University) at the IAML/IMS Conference at Julliard in New York, New York. My presentation was part of a larger panel on Virtual Spaces and our talk was entitled: Digital Madeleines and Breadcrumbs: Discovering the Musical Past through Multimodal Analyses. The slides from our presentation are available below, followed by the transcript from my talk. Francesca’s remarks are available on her site.

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Adventures in Geocoding for Neatline

Posted on December 8, 2014 by

As part of my ongoing project, Documenting Teresa Carreño, I am plotting a sample of her concert appearances between 1862 and 1865 in a Neatline Exhibit. To do this most efficiently rather than add each geocoded address to each Item Record, I explored using the programming language, Ruby. The Scholars’ Lab has two very useful tutorials on geocoding for Neatline with Ruby, which I followed and modified in order to meet my needs, and so it would function with the 2.1.4 version of Omeka that I am using for my project.1 Since I had 60 Item Records ready for import into Omeka, I wanted to geo-code the addresses of each concert appearance and import them as a batch upload using the CSV Plugin. It is also possible to create Item Records only with the location (coverage) information and a few other Dublin Core elements, which would be imported directly into Omeka using Ruby with the Mechanize Gem. (more…)

  1. Scholars’ Lab Tutorial: Geocoding for Neatline – Part I and Part II.