Newly added content to Documenting Teresa Carreño

Posted on August 19, 2013 by

I recently added more content documenting Carreño’s first performances in the United States during 1862 – 1863. During this time, the majority of her concerts occurred in New York City or Boston, MA. The content that is currently available on my site: Documenting Teresa Carreño, includes primary source citations, as well as transcriptions, which feature reviews, advertisements, and other articles printed at the time of Carreño’s performances. There are approximately twenty-seven records (as of 8/16/2013) that I have released, which document her reception in New York City and other New England cities between October 1862 – January 1863 with over 100 primary sources and transcriptions. These primary source documents taken from newspapers and music periodicals provide rich documentation about Carreño’s earliest performances in the United States, including details about her repertoire, stage presence, and interactions or associations with other musicians.

These records can be accessed in several ways, including through a simple or advanced search, which is useful if you are interested in searching for a specific composition, venue, or musician associated with Carreño’s performances. I have also tagged each record with the name of the venue (i.e. Irving Hall) and location (i.e. Boston), as well as type of event (i.e. charity). I have been pondering adding additional tags in the future, especially tags to identify repertoire (i.e. “Gottschalk Waltz”). Tags allow you to quickly isolate only those records that have something in common, such as a specific work or musician and I think this will be very useful as more records are added from her fifity-plus year career.

In addition to adding more records and transcriptions, I have enabled the Geolocation plugin, which allows me to plot her performances on a Google map. This is a separate plugin from Neatline, which I still hope to use with historical map overlays, but for the time being, the Geolocation plugin provides a quick way to visualize her performances on a map. 

Using the Geolocation plugin was very straightforward. Once the Geolocation plugin is installed and activated, you will see a “Map” tab within your item records. This is where you can search for a location using an address or latitude/longitude coordinates.

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(Admin view, Omeka v. 1.5.3)

After you input your address or coordinates, you can save the changes and the location will appear on a map within your item record view. If you don’t want the map to appear within each individual item record view, you can disable this. In v. 1.5.3. you can do this by going into your “Settings,” selecting “Plugins” and configuring the Geolocation plugin. If you prefer to include the map as part of your page’s navigation menu or sidebar, you can add the page address to the menu (i.e. http://example.com/geolocation/map/browse).

Once you’ve configured your Geolocation plugin and added location information in the “Map” tab in your item records, you will have a Google Map which shows those locations.

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By selecting either an event from the left column or clicking on a point on the map, a text box will open with a brief description of the event. If you would like to view the full record, including a transcription, or image (when available), you can click on the event/date header and it will take you directly to the item page. The only downside of the Geolocation plugin is that it does not allow you to assign multiple geolocation markers to a single record. This is unfortunate, because it does not allow you to easily isolate all events per one location. This means that if you want to view the nine performances at Irving Hall in 1862, only one of them will be attached to the point on the map. However, you can select an item directly from the list (left-hand column) and it will appear on the map.

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You can view the map that I’ve created of Carreño’s performances or visit Documenting Teresa Carreño and explore all of the content. As always, if you have feedback or suggestions about the content or the site, please send them my way.

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