Tag Archives: bibliographic research

MLA Conference Diary (Reflection on Challenges, Evolving Roles, and Community)

Posted on March 11, 2016 by

Cross-posted on the MLA Conference Diary (IAML website). The annual conference of the Music Library Association was held March 2-5, 2016 in Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Each year the MLA conference brings together people with a shared interest in music librarianship and music resources. While this interest may be directly linked to our professional roles and careers, we also represent a community of people who may have started out as musicians, archivists and librarians working with music-specific materials, but now represent roles in emerging or evolving areas, such as metadata, discovery services, digital preservation, or digital humanities. It is this sense of community that brings me (and others I know) to the MLA conference every year.

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Omeka & Bibliographic Research

Posted on July 5, 2013 by

My project, Documenting Carreño, is built in an open-source web-publishing platform called Omeka. If you’re wondering why I decided to choose Omeka rather than the many other platforms available to me, you can check out a presentation I gave in May 2013 about using Omeka and geo-spatial tools (with overviews of a few other options). Essentially, Omeka is a multimodal system for content management, collections management, and archival digital collections; it is also flexible and user-friendly. If you’re interested in tutorials that range from installing to creating content within Omeka, there are some great ones already out there (so I won’t recreate the wheel). Miriam Posner’s posts and handy pdf will get you started using Omeka.net, or you can view screencasts on Omeka.org (for version 1.0+). There is also a more advanced tutorial from the Scholars’ Lab on installing Omeka using Amazon Web Services. There are two options for those interested in creating a project in Omeka, you can sign up for Omeka.net, which is a hosted service that comes pre-installed with several plugins or you can install and implement the full system from Omeka.org on a server or hosted service (i.e. Dreamhost). Here’s a comparison list of Omeka.net vs. Omeka.org. I chose to use the self-hosted version from Omeka.org because it allows me to customize the site as I wish, as well as implement any of the plugins created for Omeka. (more…)

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