Tag Archives: open access

Rebalancing the Music Canon

Posted on February 21, 2019 by

I’d like to share news about a project that I have been thinking about starting since I gave my keynote about the lack of women and people of color in digital music/data projects at the Music Encoding Conference in May 2018 at University of Maryland. I wanted to create a music data repository focused on works by un(der)-represented people with the aim of decentering the musical canon and making data-driven music scholarship more diverse and inclusive. In particular, the repository will contain a dataset of compositions spanning a large historical period by an un(der)-represented group (primarily women and people of color) that has generally been left out of (big) data driven scholarship work. (more…)

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Happy 163rd Birthday, Teresa Carreño / Feliz Cumpleaños!

Posted on December 18, 2016 by

One hundred and sixty three years ago today (12/22/1853), María Teresa Gertrudis de Jesús Carreño (Teresa Carreño) was born in Caracas, Venezuela. She became a piano prodigy who débuted at Irving Hall in New York City on November 25, 1862 at the age of eight years old. Performing works by Johann Nepomuk Hummel, Sigismond Thalberg, Theodor Döhler, and Louis M. Gottschalk, which delighted her audience and demonstrated her virtuosic abilities, prompting New York critics to write: (more…)

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Omeka & Bibliographic Research

Posted on July 5, 2013 by

My project, Documenting Carreño, is built in an open-source web-publishing platform called Omeka. If you’re wondering why I decided to choose Omeka rather than the many other platforms available to me, you can check out a presentation I gave in May 2013 about using Omeka and geo-spatial tools (with overviews of a few other options). Essentially, Omeka is a multimodal system for content management, collections management, and archival digital collections; it is also flexible and user-friendly. If you’re interested in tutorials that range from installing to creating content within Omeka, there are some great ones already out there (so I won’t recreate the wheel). Miriam Posner’s posts and handy pdf will get you started using Omeka.net, or you can view screencasts on Omeka.org (for version 1.0+). There is also a more advanced tutorial from the Scholars’ Lab on installing Omeka using Amazon Web Services. There are two options for those interested in creating a project in Omeka, you can sign up for Omeka.net, which is a hosted service that comes pre-installed with several plugins or you can install and implement the full system from Omeka.org on a server or hosted service (i.e. Dreamhost). Here’s a comparison list of Omeka.net vs. Omeka.org. I chose to use the self-hosted version from Omeka.org because it allows me to customize the site as I wish, as well as implement any of the plugins created for Omeka. (more…)

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